29 January, 2009

2008 Yiwu Zhengshan - Douji "Dadou"

What a tiny, weeny fellow this is. Eensy-weensy, in fact, barely larger than a box of safety matches. $5 from Puerh Shop makes it an easy nibble.

Douji: sometimes yum, sometimes a bit more ho-hum. Generally reliable, occassionally excellent, and not immensely overpriced. I keep an eye on every Douji production that becomes available via the usual vendors, just in case it's a corker.


2008 Douji Dadou


The leaves are also weeny, and quite fragmented. If I strain, I can make out a very quiet, distant sweetness. Impotent tea?


2008 Douji Dadou


Thankfully not. The soup is particularly active, swiftly darkening to orange in the gongdaobei as I watch it. This activity is obvious in the mouth, setting lips and tongue a-tingling. Active tea is a lovely thing - the liveliness gives me the impression of cleanliness, and good growing conditions. It's hard to imagine a mass-produced plant giving such energy.

A huigan builds rapidly, in concert with a yunxiang of quick, sweet leather - a sharp scent that darts in and out of the nose without lingering. A tea with some build-up, a crescendo, some sort of sensation in the mouth is a fine thing indeed. Flat teas I cannot abide.

Even though conservative with the quantity of leaves, this is a very tasty affair: soft and almost creamy. Long after the tea has gone, the lips remain buzzing, almost aching, in a pleasant way. In its flavour, it reminds me of the lovely 2006 Daye Qingbing that I liberated from Maliandao.


2008 Douji Dadou


What a savoury little thing this brick turns out to be, delving into deeper, nuttier flavours. My arms warm up, my palms tingle, and all is well in the world. Signs of physiological addiction? Surely!


2008 Douji Dadou


The leaves turn out to be firm and strong. Grow a plant on too much fertiliser and it tends to be weak, fragile. Grow a plant "slowly", with good soil, and it turns out strong and healthy. Fine and dandy though the factory teas may be (Menghai, Xiaguan), I've found their 2008 leaves to be thin, easily torn, tending towards being anaemic. In contrast, these are bold and healthy leaves, and they have a little bit more oomph tucked away, ready to give to the brew.

I appreciate this little chap - plus, it stores really well, not taking up much in the way of space, being perfectly cuboid and served in packets of six. Each 300g box is thus a wee bit lighter than a bing, and I see myself dipping into my two boxes quite regularly.

A fun, lightweight treat that isn't too demanding, and has plenty to give. Dip into one and see for yourself.

(P.s., by popular request, this tea is approximately pronounced EE-WOO DJUNG-SHAN DOH-GEE DAR-DOH.)

6 comments:

David said...

just came across your blog through T-Ching, it's lovely, very informative. I've just started a new one for our site - http://jingtea.wordpress.com/ - it's early days but would love to hear your thoughts

Hobbes said...

Dear David,

Thanks for stopping by, and for your link - it seems like an informative read, and I've added it to my Reader. Keep writing!


Toodlepip,

Hobbes

Edward said...

Hobbes,
Do you know what the difference is between the Shangdou and Dadou offerings of this tea? Are they grades?
Thanks,
Edk

Hobbes said...

Dear Edward,

I believe that they are two entirely different teas - thanks for reminding me about the Shangdou, as I have one for tasting that I'd forgetten about! I'll have it soon and get back to you. :)


Toodlepip,

Hobbes

Edward said...

Hobbes,
I'm still looking forward to your opinion to the Shangdou. Especially since Pu-erh Shop has full cakes of them out. ;)
Thanks,
Edk

Hobbes said...

Dear Edward,

Funnily enough, I have a review of the Shengdou brick queued up for publication! I enjoyed it. I've not had the cake, but have one of each of Douji's productions from 2009 coming to me from Taobao - go for it, I say! If it's similar to the brick, it'll be milky and tasty.


Toodlepip,

Hobbes